GenNET Arkansas Course Descriptions

GenNET Arkansas Course Descriptions

 

3D Art I – Modeling
This course focuses on the fundamental anconcepts of 3D modeling and explores the basic concepts and skills of 3D animation. Students learn Blender software to create 3D models such as a house, a creature, an animation of the creature walking, and a landscape terrain. Activities include using points on a grid to create mountains and using a color gradient to create a sun and a moon. Students learn 3D space and 3D objects; creating, scaling, and rotating objects; materials and textures; poses and key frames; extruding and mirroring 3D objects; rendering animations; and appending materials, textures, objects, armatures, and animations.


3D Art II – Animation
This course focuses on building animation skills including realistic movement and lighting. Students learn the Blender? software workspace and tools; location and rotation properties; scripts; IP curves; vector handles; rendering and baking animations and simulations; and particle systems and emitters. Activities and projects promote key 3D animation concepts including frames and key frames, squash and stretch, action strips, walk cycles and poses, and trajectories. Students develop the skills needed to design and create animations with an understanding of the skills needed to succeed as professional animators. (Prerequisite: 3D Art I ? Modeling).


Accounting
In this course, students will master the fundamental principles and procedures of the modern practice of accounting. They will gain practical experience with bookkeeping and preparing financial reports within the context of operating a sole proprietorship. Students will use a problem solving approach to actively apply key concepts of introductory accounting to realistic case studies. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify accounting fundamentals, analyze financial reporting, apply principles of accounting for merchandising operations as well as analyze advanced accounting topics.


Advertising and Sales Promotion
What comes to mind when you think of marketing? Does a favorite commercial jingle begin to play in your head? Or do you recall the irritating phone call from a company trying to sell you software you already have? No matter what your feelings are about it, there’s no denying the sheer magnitude of the marketing industry. Every year companies spend $200 billion promoting their products and services—and that’s in the United States alone! Experts estimate that by the time you turn 65, you will have seen nearly 2 million TV commercials, not to mention radio ads, billboards, and online advertisements. You’re familiar with what it’s like on the receiving end of a company’s marketing efforts, but what’s it like on the other side? In this Advertising and Sales Promotions course, you’ll learn how marketing campaigns, ads, and commercials are conceived and brought to life. You’ll meet some of the creative men and women who produce those memorable ads and commercials. And you’ll discover career opportunities in the field to help you decide if a job in this exciting, fast-paced industry is in your future!


African-American History
Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans from the slave trade, through emancipation, to the modern African diaspora, students will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life.


Advanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics A
This is the first semester of a full year course. Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.


Advanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics A-CR
This is the first semester of a full year course. Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Advanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics B
This is the second semester of a full year course. Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.


Advanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics B-CR
This is the second semester of a full year course. Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


American Sign Language 1A
Did you know that American Sign Language (ASL) is the third most commonly used language in North America? The predominant sign language of Deaf communities in the United States, American Sign Language is complex and robust, consisting of signs made with the hands, facial expressions, and body postures. American Sign Language 1A will introduce you to the language, grammar, and phonology, so that you can start communicating right away. Importantly, you will explore Deaf culture – social beliefs, traditions, history, values and communities influenced by deafness and which use sign language as the primary means of communication.


American Sign Language 1B
Did you know that American Sign Language (ASL) is the third most commonly used language in North America? The predominant sign language of Deaf communities in the United States, American Sign Language is complex and robust, consisting of signs made with the hands, facial expressions, and body postures. American Sign Language 1B will introduce you to the language, grammar, and phonology, so that you can start communicating right away. Importantly, you will explore Deaf culture – social beliefs, traditions, history, values and communities influenced by deafness and which use sign language as the primary means of communication.


American Sign Language 2A
American Sign Language (ASL) is a fascinating and complicated language that plays a huge part in deaf culture. In American Sign Language 2A: Communicating, you will build on the skills you learned in American Sign Language 1 and explore its long and rich history. In this course, you will also expand your knowledge of the language as well as your understanding of the world in which it is frequently used. Grow your sign vocabulary and improve your ability to interact using facial expressions and body language. You will also learn current trends in technology within ASL as well as potential education and career opportunities.


American Sign Language 2B
American Sign Language (ASL) is a fascinating and complicated language that plays a huge part in deaf culture. In American Sign Language 2B: Communicating, you will build on the skills you learned in American Sign Language 1 and 2A and explore its long and rich history. In this course, you will also expand your knowledge of the language as well as your understanding of the world in which it is frequently used. Grow your sign vocabulary and improve your ability to interact using facial expressions and body language. You will also learn current trends in technology within ASL as well as potential education and career opportunities.


Bridge to Algebra II A – CR
This is the first semester of a full-year course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.


Bridge to Algebra II A – CR
This is the first semester of a full-year course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Bridge to Algebra II B
This is the second semester of a full-year course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.


Bridge to Algebra II B – CR
This is the second semester of a full-year course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Algebra I A
This is the first semester of a full-year course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.


Algebra I A Honors
This is the first semester of a full-year honors course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


Algebra I A-CR
This is the first semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Algebra I B
This is the second semester of a full-year course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.


Algebra I B Honors
This is the second semester of a full-year honors course that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


Algebra I B-CR
This is the second semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students? understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Algebra II A
This is the first semester of a one year course that focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.


Algebra II A Honors
This is the first semester of a one year honors course that focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


Algebra II A-CR
This is the first semester of a one year course for credit recovery that focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Algebra II B
This is the second semester of a one year course that focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.


Algebra II B Honors
This is the second semester of a one year honors course that focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


Algebra II B-CR
This is the second semester of a one year course for credit recovery that focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Algebra III A
This is the first semester of a one year course. With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Algebra III is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.


Algebra III A – CR
This is the first semester of a one year course. With an emphasis on function families and their representations,sAdvanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Algebra III B
This is the second semester of a one year course. With an emphasis on function families and their representations,sAdvanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.


Algebra III B – CR
This is the second semester of a one year course. With an emphasis on function families and their representations,sAdvanced Topics and Modeling in Mathematics is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Animation
Do you wonder what it would be like to create the next blockbuster animated movie or do you want to make the next big video game? Do you have an eye for drawing, technology, and timing? If so, Animation is the course for you! You will learn how to use animation tools to conceptualize and bring your creations to life. You’ll learn the ins and outs of creating 2D and 3D animation, from start to finish. You’ll even begin working on our own design portfolio and get hands on experience with creating your own animation projects. Learning about Animation could lead to a thriving career in the growing world of technology and animation.


Anthropology I: Uncovering Human Mysteries
The aim of anthropology is to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present and future, and in addition address the problems humans face in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change. Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the anthropological world are just one of the powerful learning tools utilized in this course.


Anthropology II: More Human Mysteries Uncovered
Anthropology has helped us better understand cultures around the world and through different time period. This course continues the study of global cultures and the ways that humans have made sense of their world. We will examine some of the ways that cultures have understood and gave meaning to different stages of life and death. The course will also examine the creation of art within cultures and examine how cultures evolve and change over time. Finally, we will apply the concepts and insights learned from the study of anthropology to several cultures found in the world today.


Cybersecurity I
We depend more and more on the technologies we interact with every day, and we put more and more of our personal data out there online. Can all of that data really be kept “secret”? We all need to know more about how to protect our personal information, especially given how much we rely on and use our network devices and media. You’ll learn about the various parts of your computer, how they work together, and how you can manipulate them to keep your data safe. You’ll also dive into the tools, technologies, and methods that will help protect you from an attack and discover the many opportunities in the rapidly growing field of cybersecurity.


Cybersecurity II
Ever wonder what it’s like to be a hacker? Or think about who is trying to steal your passwords while you’re shopping online using the free Wi-Fi at your local coffee shop? Unmask the cybersecurity threats around you by understanding hackers and identifying weaknesses in your online behavior. Learn to avoid the various types of cyberattacks, including those to your social media accounts, and to predict the potential legal consequences of sharing or accessing information that you do not have rights to. Dig into these crimes in depth by taking a look at cyber forensics and other cybersecurity careers. In a world where such threats have no boundaries, cybersecurity will undoubtedly play an increasingly larger role in our personal and professional lives in the years to come.


Calculus AB A
This is the first semester of AP® Calculus AB, a yearlong, college‐level course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB exam. Major topics of study in this full‐year course include a review of precalculus; the use of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and mathematical modeling of differential equations; and the applications of these concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology to solve problems and draw conclusions. The course uses a multi‐representative approach to calculus, with concepts and problems expressed numerically, graphically, verbally, and analytically. This course is aligned to the new College Board AP Calculus AB course description that was introduced in 2016.

Calculus AB B
This is the first semester of AP® Calculus AB, a yearlong, college‐level course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB exam. Major topics of study in this full‐year course include a review of precalculus; the use of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and mathematical modeling of differential equations; and the applications of these concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology to solve problems and draw conclusions. The course uses a multi‐representative approach to calculus, with concepts and problems expressed numerically, graphically, verbally, and analytically. This course is aligned to the new College Board AP Calculus AB course description that was introduced in 2016.


English Language & Composition A
This is the first semester of college-level, yearlong course that prepares students for the Advanced Placement? English Language and Composition Exam while exploring and analyzing a variety of rhetorical contexts. This is a fast-paced, upper-level course designed for highly motivated students. Multiple opportunities are provided to enhance test-taking skills through critical reading, writing, classroom assignments and discussion activities. Advanced Placement English Language and Composition practice assessments and essays will be given throughout the course as well. This course provides students an opportunity to increase knowledge concerning prose of many styles and genres, including essays, journalistic writing, political writing, science writing, nature writing, autobiographies/biographies, diaries, speeches, history writing, and critical writing. Throughout the course there is an intense focus on writing and revising expository, analytical, and argumentative essays to prepare students for a broad range of writing purposes. An Additional AP textbook is required.


English Language & Composition B
This is the second semester of college-level, yearlong course that prepares students for the Advanced Placement? English Language and Composition Exam while exploring and analyzing a variety of rhetorical contexts. This is a fast-paced, upper-level course designed for highly motivated students. Multiple opportunities are provided to enhance test-taking skills through critical reading, writing, classroom assignments and discussion activities. Advanced Placement English Language and Composition practice assessments and essays will be given throughout the course as well. This course provides students an opportunity to increase knowledge concerning prose of many styles and genres, including essays, journalistic writing, political writing, science writing, nature writing, autobiographies/biographies, diaries, speeches, history writing, and critical writing. Throughout the course there is an intense focus on writing and revising expository, analytical, and argumentative essays to prepare students for a broad range of writing purposes. An Additional AP textbook is required.


English Literature & Composition A
This is the first semester of AP Literature and Composition, which is designed to be a college/university-level course. This course equips students to critically analyze all forms of literature in order to comment insightfully about an author?s or genre?s use of style or literary device. Students will also interpret meaning based on form; examine the trademark characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. As students consider styles and devices, they will apply them to their creative writing. In addition to exposing students to college-level English coursework, this course prepares them for the AP exam. An Additional AP textbook is required.


English Literature & Composition B
This is the second semester of AP Literature and Composition, which is designed to be a college/university-level course. This course equips students to critically analyze all forms of literature in order to comment insightfully about an author?s or genre?s use of style or literary device. Students will also interpret meaning based on form; examine the trademark characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. As students consider styles and devices, they will apply them to their creative writing. In addition to exposing students to college-level English coursework, this course prepares them for the AP exam. An Additional AP textbook is required.


AP Environmental Science A
This is the first semester of AP Environmental Science, which is a laboratory- and field-based course designed to provide students with the content and skills needed to understand the various interrelationships in the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, and to propose and examine solutions to these problems. Since this is an online course, the laboratory- and field-based activities will be completed virtually and via experiments that students can easily perform at home with common materials. The course is intended to be the equivalent of a one-semester, college-level ecology course, which is taught over a full year in high school. The course encompasses human population dynamics, interrelationships in nature, energy flow, resources, environmental quality, human impact on environmental systems, and environmental law.


AP Environmental Science B
This is the second semester of AP Environmental Science, which is a laboratory- and field-based course designed to provide students with the content and skills needed to understand the various interrelationships in the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, and to propose and examine solutions to these problems. Since this is an online course, the laboratory- and field-based activities will be completed virtually and via experiments that students can easily perform at home with common materials. The course is intended to be the equivalent of a one-semester, college-level ecology course, which is taught over a full year in high school. The course encompasses human population dynamics, interrelationships in nature, energy flow, resources, environmental quality, human impact on environmental systems, and environmental law.


French Language & Culture A
This is the first semester of French Language & Culture, an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP French Language course prepares them for the AP French exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course is designed as an immersion experience requiring the use of French exclusively. The online learning coach only uses French to communicate with students. In addition, all the reading, listening, speaking and writing is in French. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. The course contains a forum where students share their own opinions and comments and comment on other students? posts. The course makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.


French Language & Culture B
This is the second semester of French Language & Culture, an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP French Language course prepares them for the AP French exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course is designed as an immersion experience requiring the use of French exclusively. The online learning coach only uses French to communicate with students. In addition, all the reading, listening, speaking and writing is in French. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. The course contains a forum where students share their own opinions and comments and comment on other students? posts. The course makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.


Human Geography A
This is the first semester of Human Geography, a college-level, yearlong course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement? Human Geography Exam. The goal of the course is to provide students with a geographic perspective through which to view the world. Through a combination of direct instruction, documentary videos, and online readings, students will explore geographic concepts, theories, and models; human-environment interactions; and interactions among human systems. Topics covered include population, culture, political organization of space, agricultural land use, industrialization, and urban land use. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through essays, document-based questions, student collaborative activities, and practice AP exams. An Additional AP textbook is required.


Human Geography B
This is the second semester of Human Geography, a college-level, yearlong course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement? Human Geography Exam. The goal of the course is to provide students with a geographic perspective through which to view the world. Through a combination of direct instruction, documentary videos, and online readings, students will explore geographic concepts, theories, and models; human-environment interactions; and interactions among human systems. Topics covered include population, culture, political organization of space, agricultural land use, industrialization, and urban land use. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through essays, document-based questions, student collaborative activities, and practice AP exams. An Additional AP textbook is required.


Psychology A
This is the first semester of the AP Psychology Course, which will introduce students to the systematic study of the behavior and mental processes of human means and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major fields within psychology. Students will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The major aim of this course is to provide each student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most introductory college psychology courses. In addition, this course has been designed to help students successfully achieve a passing score on the AP Exam. An Additional AP textbook is required.


Psychology B
This is the second semester of the AP Psychology Course, which will introduce students to the systematic study of the behavior and mental processes of human means and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major fields within psychology. Students will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The major aim of this course is to provide each student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most introductory college psychology courses. In addition, this course has been designed to help students successfully achieve a passing score on the AP Exam. An Additional AP textbook is required.


Spanish Language & Culture A
This is the first semester of Spanish Language and Culture, an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course prepares students for the College Board?s AP Spanish Language and Culture exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course is designed as an immersion experience and is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. In addition, all student work, practices, projects, participation, and assessments are in Spanish. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. In addition, students participate in a forum where they are able to share their own opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students? posts. The course also makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.


Spanish Language & Culture B
This is the second semester of Spanish Language and Culture, an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course prepares students for the College Board?s AP Spanish Language and Culture exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course is designed as an immersion experience and is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. In addition, all student work, practices, projects, participation, and assessments are in Spanish. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. In addition, students participate in a forum where they are able to share their own opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students? posts. The course also makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.


AP U.S. Government & Politics
This one-semester college-level course is designed to prepare students for the AP United States Government and Politics exam. Students will study the Constitutional underpinnings and structure of the United States government, issues of politics and political parties, and topics in civil rights and public policy, demonstrating their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, project-based activities, and practice exams.


U.S. History A
This is the first semester of a full year course that surveys the history of the United States from the settlement of the New World to modern times and prepares students for the new 2015 AP U.S. History exam. The course emphasizes themes such as national identity, economic transformation, immigration, politics, international relations, geography, and social and cultural change. Students learn to assess historical materials, weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship, and analyze and express historical understanding in writing.


U.S. History B
This is the second semester of a full year course that surveys the history of the United States from the settlement of the New World to modern times and prepares students for the new 2015 AP U.S. History exam. The course emphasizes themes such as national identity, economic transformation, immigration, politics, international relations, geography, and social and cultural change. Students learn to assess historical materials, weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship, and analyze and express historical understanding in writing.

World History A
This is the first semester of a one year advanced study of world history that combines historical thinking skills with the in-depth exploration of major course themes such as the interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and interaction of economics systems; and more. Students engage in reading, writing, and discussion as they trace history from before the Common Era to the present. An Additional AP textbook is required.


World History B
This is the second semester of a one year advanced study of world history that combines historical thinking skills with the in-depth exploration of major course themes such as the interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and interaction of economics systems; and more. Students engage in reading, writing, and discussion as they trace history from before the Common Era to the present. An Additional AP textbook is required.


World History Grade 6 A
This is the first semester of a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations up to the Age of Revolution. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.


World History Grade 6 A – CR
This is the first semester of a yearlong credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations up to the Age of Revolution. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World History Grade 6 B
This is the second semester of a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations up to the Age of Revolution. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.


World History Grade 6 B – CR
This is the second semester of a yearlong credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations up to the Age of Revolution. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World History Since 1450 A
This is the first semester of a two semester course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.


World History Since 1450 A – CR
This is the first semester of a two semester course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World History Since 1450 B
This is the second semester of a two semester course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.


World History Since 1450 B – CR
This is the second semester of a two semester course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Approaches to Studying Religions
This course will illustrate the basic concepts integral to the study of religion and understanding how these concepts apply in real world situations. Student will explore key components of religions as they apply to a range of different belief systems and analyze the role of religion in modern society. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify key approaches to religious study; identify common elements of religions; analyze religion’s impact on individuals, society, and the world; and evaluate social, ethical, and cultural topics through the lens of religion.


Archaeology: Detectives of the Past
George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” The field of archaeology helps us to better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped to shape our modern world. This course focuses on this techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students will learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted, as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students will learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.


Art History I (Prehistoric to Renaissance)
Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth- century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and Baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas.


Art History I (Prehistoric to Renaissance) CR
Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth- century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and Baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Art History I
Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth- century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and Baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas.


Astronomy: Exploring the Universe
Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.


Biology A
This is the first semester of a compelling two-semester course that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options.


Biology A-CR
This is the first semester of a compelling two-semester course for credit recovery that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Biology B
This is the second semester of a compelling two-semester course that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options.


Biology B CR
This is the second semester of a compelling two-semester course for credit recovery that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Biology – Integrated A
This is the first semester of a compelling two-semester course that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options.


Biology – Integrated A – CR
This is the first semester of a compelling two-semester course that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Biology – Integrated B
This is the second semester of a compelling two-semester course that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options.


Biology – Integrated B – CR
This is the second semester of a compelling two-semester course that engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Career Explorations A
This course prepares middle school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skill demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of students.


Career Explorations B
This course prepares middle school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skill demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of students.


Career Planning and Development
Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today?s challenging job market. This relevant and timely course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop the skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. This one-semester course includes lessons in which students create a self-assessment profile, a cover letter, and a róum that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.


Careers in Criminal Justice
The criminal justice system offers a wide range of career opportunities. In this course, students will explore different areas of the criminal justice system, including the trial process, the juvenile justice system, and the correctional system.


Chemistry A
This is the first semester of a rigorous, full-year course that engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher- order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.


Chemistry A-CR
This is the first semester of a rigorous, full-year course for credit recovery that engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher- order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Chemistry B
This is the second semester of a rigorous, full-year course that engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher- order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.


Chemistry B CR
This is the second semester of a rigorous, full-year course for credit recovery that engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher- order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Chinese 1 A
In this first semester of a one year middle school course, students begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.


Chinese 1 B
In this second semester of a one year middle school course, students begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.


Chinese 2 A
In this first semester of a one year course, middle school students continue their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.


Chinese 2 B
In this second semester of a one year course, middle school students continue their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.


Chinese I A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.


Chinese I B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to Chinese with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries.


Chinese II A
In this first semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to Chinese in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries, and assessments.


Chinese II B
In this second semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to Chinese in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Chinese-speaking countries, and assessments.


College Algebra
Students in this course will build mastery around linear, non- linear, and other mathematical functions that include algebraic, graphic, and numeric properties. Students will demonstrate the application of these concepts in real-life scenarios. Upon course completion, students will be able to perform mathematical functions with real numbers; apply mathematical concepts to linear equations, inequalities, and series/sequences; and apply mathematical concepts to linear representations and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Additionally, they will be able to apply mathematical concepts to algebraic expressions, quadratic equations, functions, and non-linear equations.


Computer Applications: Office® 2010 A This is the first semester of a two-semester course that introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely-used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office® 2010 documents for both personal and professional use. By the end of this complete course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the most common tools and features of the Microsoft Office 2010 suite of applications: Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, and Outlook®.

Computer Applications: Office® 2010 B
This is the second semester of a two-semester course that introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely-used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office® 2010 documents for both personal and professional use. By the end of this complete course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the most common tools and features of the Microsoft Office 2010 suite of applications: Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, and Outlook®.


Computer Science
This one-semester course introduces students to the basics of computer science through a series of Python? programming projects that encourage creativity and experimentation. Students create a diverse portfolio of projects as they learn commands and functions, values and variables, Graphical User Interface, modular and object-oriented programming, and events and event-driven processes. Students also learn loops, debugging techniques, software-development processes, arrays and sets, generators and namespaces, packages and libraries, randomness, file handling, and how to program simple games. Students explore careers in programming, including profiles from a wide variety of programming professionals.


Concepts of Engineering and Technology
Each day, we are surrounded by technology and engineering projects. From our phones to the bridges we drive over, engineering and technology influence many parts of our lives. In Concepts of Engineering and Technology, you will learn more about engineering and technology careers and what skills and knowledge you’ll need to succeed in these fields. You’ll explore innovative and cutting-edge projects that are changing the world we live in and examine the design and prototype development process. Concepts of Engineering and Technology will also help you understand the emerging issues in this exciting career field.


Conflict Resolution
This course will teach students the basic concepts of conflict resolution and how to apply these concepts in real-world situations as well as their own lives. Students will explore key theories and skills associated with conflict resolution in a variety of contexts, including organizational, intercultural, family, and interpersonal. Upon course completion, students will be able to describe conflict resolution and theories of conflict, examine the fundamentals of conflict order, and develop conflict resolution skills. They will be able to interpret the role of culture and gender in conflict resolution, analyze group conflict, and apply the strategies of conflict resolution to real-world scenarios.


Contemporary Health
Available as either a semester or year-long course, this high-school health offering examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws. This course takes covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and other sensitive topics. For a more conservative approach to health education, the Healthy Living course is also available in the Health and Physical Education Bundle


Contemporary Health Credit Recovery
Available as either a semester or year-long course, this high-school health offering examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws. This course takes covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and other sensitive topics. For a more conservative approach to health education, the Healthy Living course is also available in the Health and Physical Education Bundle This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Creative Writing
For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of this course, students will learn how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing.


Criminology: Inside the Criminal Mind
In today’s world, crime and deviant behavior rank at or near the top of many people’s concerns. In this course, we will study the field of Criminology – the study of crime. We will look at possible explanations for crime from the standpoint of psychological, biological and sociological perspectives, explore the categories and social consequences of crime, and investigate how the criminal justice system handles not only criminals, but also their misdeeds. Why do some individuals commit crimes why others do not? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors…from arrest to punishment…help shape the criminal case process?


Digital Arts
Digital Arts focuses on building a solid foundation of the elements of art and design: line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. Topics include learning processes for evaluating artworks and identifying selected artists? works, styles, and historical periods. Student learn 3D space in a 2D environment; filters, gradients, and highlights; and methods of working with color. By the end of this course, students will have created a unique portfolio of digital artwork, including repeating images to be used as a computer?s desktop background, a logo with text, two images scaled proportionally to one another, and a poster image and layout. Students advance their skills using Inkscape, a free open-source alternative to Adobe? Illustrator?, and also learn new tools such as the Spiral, Bezier, and Paint Bucket Tools.


Digital Photography I: Creating Images with Impact!
Have you ever wondered how photographers take such great pictures? Have you tried to take photographs and wondered why they didn’t seem to capture that moment that you saw with your eyes? The Digital Photography I course focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students will use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images, capturing people, landscapes, close-up, and action photographs.


Digital Photography II: Discovering Your Creative Potential
In today’s world, photographs are all around us, including in advertisements, on websites, and hung on our walls as art. Many of the images that we see have been created by professional photographers. In this course, we will examine various aspects of professional photography, including the ethics of the profession, and examine some of the areas that professional photographers may choose to specialize in, such as wedding photography and product photography. We will also learn more about some of the most respected professional photographers in history and we will learn how to critique photographs in order to better understand what creates an eye catching photograph.


Early Childhood Education
Want to have an impact on the most important years of human development? Students will learn how to create fun and educational environments for children, how to keep the environment safe for children, and how to encourage the health and well-being of infants, toddlers, and school-aged children.


Earth and Space Science A
High school students enrolled in the first semester of this dynamic course will explore the scope of Earth and Space Science. Students will begin by studying the origin and evolution of the universe and deepen their understanding of the universe at large. They will study the history of the earth, earth’s structure and plate tectonics, weathering and erosion, and earth’s biosphere, and the history of the earth. Earth and Space Science is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make planet Earth and its surroundings unique and how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Earth and Space Science A Credit Recovery
High school students enrolled in the first semester of this dynamic course will explore the scope of Earth and Space Science. Students will begin by studying the origin and evolution of the universe and deepen their understanding of the universe at large. They will study the history of the earth, earth’s structure and plate tectonics, weathering and erosion, earth’s biosphere, and the history of the earth. Earth and Space Science is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make planet Earth and its surroundings unique and how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Earth and Space Science B
High school students enrolled in the second semester of this dynamic course will continue to explore the scope of Earth and Space Science. Students will begin the second semester by studying earth’s hydrosphere and gain a deep understanding of water on earth, earth’s oceans, and the impact of pollution and other marine ecosystem issues. They will study earth’s atmosphere, natural resources and conservation topics, and the effects of humans and technology on earth. Earth and Space Science is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make planet Earth and its surroundings unique and how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Earth and Space Science B Credit Recovery
High school students enrolled in the second semester of this dynamic course will continue to explore the scope of Earth and Space Science. Students will begin the second semester by studying earth’s hydrosphere and gain a deep understanding of water on earth, earth’s oceans, and the impact of pollution and other marine ecosystem issues. They will study earth’s atmosphere, natural resources and conservation topics, and the effects of humans and technology on earth. Earth and Space Science is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make planet Earth and its surroundings unique and how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Eastern Hemisphere Studies A
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the eastern hemisphere. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. While studying humans around the world, students compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors. In addition, students gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world today. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and evaluate modern issues.


Eastern Hemisphere Studies B
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the eastern hemisphere. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. While studying humans around the world, students compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors. In addition, students gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world today. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and evaluate modern issues.


Eastern Hemisphere Studies A-CR
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school credit recovery course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the eastern hemisphere. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. While studying humans around the world, students compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors. In addition, students gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world today. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and evaluate modern issues. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Eastern Hemisphere Studies B-CR
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school credit recovery course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the eastern hemisphere. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. While studying humans around the world, students compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors. In addition, students gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world today. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and evaluate modern issues. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Economics
This semester-long course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives?including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.


Economics CR
This semester-long course for credit recovery invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives?including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Engineering Design
Engineering Design introduces students to computer-aided design including the creation of geometric forms, interpreting 2D and 3D drawings of objects, and editing isometric and perspective drawings in a professional CAD environment. Students learn the steps of the design process by modeling and building paper towers, bridges, or platforms. Projects include orthographic projections of 3D objects, isometric drawings, designing a 3D container, and applying math and geometry skills to models and engineering processes. Students produce drawings to meet design specifications, create oblique and perspective CAD drawings, edit drawings in a 3D CAD environment, and apply reverse engineering to an object to explore its parts, aesthetics, and manufacturing process. Students also learn Creo? Elements/Direct?, a 3D CAD modeling program used by professional engineers.


English Language Arts 10 A
This sophomore-year English first semester of a year-long course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville.


English Language Arts 10 A Honors
This sophomore-year English first semester of a year-long honors course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 10 A-CR
This sophomore-year English first semester of a year-long course for credit recovery invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 10 B
This sophomore-year English second semester of a year-long course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.


English Language Arts 10 B Honors
This sophomore-year English second semester of a year-long honors course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 10B-CR
This sophomore-year English second semester of a year-long course for credit recovery invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 11 A
This first semester of a one year junior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer and William Shakespeare. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.


English Language Arts 11 A Honors
This first semester of a one year honors version junior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer and William Shakespeare. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 11 A-CR
This first semester of a one year jumior-level English course for credit recovery offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer and William Shakespeare. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 11 B
This second semester of a one year junior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Brow d-flexning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.


English Language Arts 11 B Honors
This second semester of a one year honors version junior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Brow d-flexning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 11 B-CR
This second semester of a one year junior-level English course for credit recovery offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Brow d-flexning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 12 A
Focused on application, this first semester of a two semester senior English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.


English Language Arts 12 A Honors
Focused on application, this first semester of a two semester senior English honors course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 12 A-CR
Focused on application, this first semester of a two semester senior English course for credit recovery reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 12 B
Focused on application, this second semester of a two semester senior English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays.


English Language Arts 12 B Honors
Focused on application, this second semester of a two semester senior English honors course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 12 B-CR
Focused on application, this second semester of a two semester senior English course for credit recovery reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 9 A
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, this first semester of a two semester course provides rigorous training in the foundations of English language arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, twenty-first century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions, and recognizing organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons strengthen students? grasp of language and improve writing skills.


English Language Arts 9 A Honors
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, this first semester of a two semester honors course provides rigorous training in the foundations of English language arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, twenty-first century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions, and recognizing organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons strengthen students? grasp of language and improve writing skills. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 9 A-CR
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, this first semester of a two semester course for credit recovery provides rigorous training in the foundations of English language arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, twenty-first century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions, and recognizing organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons strengthen students? grasp of language and improve writing skills.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 9 B
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, this second semester of a two semester course provides rigorous training in the foundations of English language arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, twenty-first century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions, and recognizing organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons strengthen students? grasp of language and improve writing skills.


English Language Arts 9 B Honors
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, this second semester of a two semester honors course provides rigorous training in the foundations of English language arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, twenty-first century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions, and recognizing organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons strengthen students? grasp of language and improve writing skills. This honors course version offers complete coverage of the standards with additional instruction and assignments, including more rigorous projects, to extend learning.


English Language Arts 9 B-CR
Dedicated to creating effective and adaptable readers and writers, this second semester of a two semester course for credit recovery provides rigorous training in the foundations of English language arts skills and strategies. Using the core foundation, the course expands on and applies traditional concepts to modern, twenty-first century demands. Offering practical lessons in techniques such as visualizing, making inferences and predictions, and recognizing organizational patterns in online and offline texts, this course delivers hands-on training in applying the writing process, evaluating essays, and using MLA style and documentation. Over the course of two semesters, interactive grammar lessons strengthen students? grasp of language and improve writing skills.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 6 A
This first semester of a two-semester course course eases students? transition to middle school with engaging, age-appropriate literary and informational reading selections. Students learn to read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence to support ideas as they read essential parts of literary and informational texts and explore a full unit on Lewis Carroll?s classic novel Through the Looking Glass. Vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills are sharpened through lessons that give students explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informativANTHe, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this course, students work toward a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.


English Language Arts 6 B
This course is an extension of English Language Arts 6 A and continues to engage students with age-appropriate literary and informational reading selections. Students further develop their critical reading and text analysis skills as they read essential parts of literary and informational texts . Vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills are sharpened through lessons that give students explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.


English Language Arts 6 A-CR
This first semester of a two-semester credit recovery course course eases students? transition to middle school with engaging, age-appropriate literary and informational reading selections. Students learn to read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence to support ideas as they read essential parts of literary and informational texts and explore a full unit on Lewis Carroll?s classic novel Through the Looking Glass. Vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills are sharpened through lessons that give students explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this course, students work toward a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 6 B-CR
This credit recovery version of English Language Arts 6 B is an extension of English Language Arts 6 A-CR and continues to engage students with age-appropriate literary and informational reading selections. Students further develop their critical reading and text analysis skills as they read essential parts of literary and informational texts . Vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills are sharpened through lessons that give students explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 7 A
This course is the first of a two semester English Language Arts 7 course. Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author?s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students complete an in-depth study of Jack London?s classic novel White Fang and read excerpts from other stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.


English Language Arts 7 B
This course is the second of a two semester English Language Arts 7 course. Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author?s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students read excerpts from a variety of stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.


English Language Arts 7 A-CR
This course is the first of a two semester English Language Arts 7 credit recovery course. Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author?s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students complete an in-depth study of Jack London?s classic novel White Fang and read excerpts from other stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 7 B-CR
This course is the second of a two semester English Language Arts 7 course for credit recovery. Students grow as readers, writers, and thinkers in this middle school course. With engaging literary and informational texts, students learn to think critically, analyze an author?s language, and cite evidence to support ideas. Students read excerpts from a variety of stories, poetry, and nonfiction. Explicit modeling and ample opportunities for practice help students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills. Students also respond routinely to texts they have read. In extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 8 A
This course is the first of a two semester English Language Arts 8 course. In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational texts engage students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.


English Language Arts 8 B
This course is the second of a two semester English Language Arts 8 course. In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational texts engage students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.


English Language Arts 8 A-CR
This course is the first of a two semester English Language Arts 8 credit recovery course. In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational texts engage students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


English Language Arts 8 B-CR
This course is the second of a two semester English Language Arts 8 course for credit recovery. In this course, students build on their knowledge and blossom as thoughtful readers and clear, effective writers. A balance of literary and informational texts engage students throughout the course in reading critically, analyzing texts, and citing evidence to support claims. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through lessons designed to provide explicit modeling and ample opportunities to practice. Students also routinely write responses to texts they have read, and use more extensive, process-based lessons to produce full-length essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats. In this full-year course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Environmental Science A
Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and this first semester of a two-semester course offers compelling lessons that cover many aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.


Environmental Science B
Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and this second semester of a two-semester course offers compelling lessons that cover many aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.


Expository Reading and Writing A
This first semester of a one year elective English course is designed to develop critical reading and writing skills while preparing high school students to meet the demands of college-level work. While students will explore some critical reading skills in fiction, poetry, and drama the focus of this course will be on expository and persuasive texts and the analytical reading skills that are necessary for college success. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Cesar Chavez, Martin Luther King Jr., Julia Alvarez.


Expository Reading and Writing B
This second semester of a one year elective English course is designed to develop critical reading and writing skills while preparing high school students to meet the demands of college-level work. While students will explore some critical reading skills in fiction, poetry, and drama the focus of this course will be on expository and persuasive texts and the analytical reading skills that are necessary for college success. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Walt Whitman, Abraham Lincoln, Langston Hughes, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Gary Soto.


Fashion & Interior Design
Do you have a flair for fashion? Are you constantly redecorating your room? If so, the design industry might just be for you! In this course, you’ll explore what it is like to work in the industry by exploring career possibilities and the background that you need to pursue them. Get ready to try your hand at designing as you learn the basics of color and design then test your skills through hands-on projects. In addition, you’ll develop the essential communication skills that build success in any business. By the end of the course, you’ll be well on your way to developing the portfolio you need to get your stylishly clad foot in the door of this exciting field.


Financial Math A
This is the first semester of a full year course. Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.


Financial Math B
This is the second semester of a full year course. Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.


Forensic Science I: Secrets of the Dead
Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed.


Forensic Science II: More Secrets of the Dead
Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.


Foundations of Personal Wellness A
Exploring a combination of health and fitness concepts, this first semester of a full year comprehensive and cohesive course explores all aspects of wellness. Designed for high school students, coursework uses pedagogical planning to ensure that students explore fitness and physical health and encourages students to learn about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle.


Foundations of Personal Wellness B
Exploring a combination of health and fitness concepts, his second semester of a full year comprehensive and cohesive course explores all aspects of wellness. Designed for high school students, coursework uses pedagogical planning to ensure that students explore fitness and physical health and encourages students to learn about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle.


French 1 A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in middle school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.


French 1 B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in middle school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.


French 2 A
In this first semester of a one year course, middle school students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.


French 2 B
In this second semester of a one year course, middle school students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.


French I A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.


French I B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and across the globe.


French II A
In this first semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to French in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments.


French II B
In this second semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to French in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments.


French III A
In this first semester of a one year expanding engagement with French, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


French III B
In this second semester of a one year expanding engagement with French, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Game Design I
The possibilities are endless when it comes to video game design! Learn about the history of gaming, software and hardware, trouble shooting, and Internet safety. Tap into your creative abilities and learn the necessary technical skills to design your own gaming platforms and create a plan for a 2D game. Turn your hobby into a future career.



Game Design II
Explore all things related to video game design. Gain skills to conceptualize, design, and fully create a video game. Explore software and hardware, sharpen your coding skills, learn about storylines, player progression, and algorithmic decision making. Analyze a variety of game play components.


Geography Grade 7 A
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the first semester of a two-semester middle school course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns.


Geography Grade 7 A – CR
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the first semester of a two-semester middle school course for credit recovery that helps students understand the physical and human diversity. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Geography Grade 7 B
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns.


Geography Grade 7 B – CR
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course for credit recovery that helps students understand the physical and human diversity. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World Geography
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this is the first semester of a high school course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems?from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution?this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.


World Geography – CR
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this is the first semester of a high school course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems?from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution?this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Geometry A
This first semester of a one year Geometry course formalizes what students learned about geometry in the middle grades with a focus on reasoning and making mathematical arguments. Mathematical reasoning is introduced with a study of triangle congruency, including exposure to formal proofs and geometric constructions. Then students extend what they have learned to other essential triangle concepts, including similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and the Laws of Sines and Cosines. “


Geometry A-CR
This first semester of a one year Geometry course for credit recovery formalizes what students learned about geometry in the middle grades with a focus on reasoning and making mathematical arguments. Mathematical reasoning is introduced with a study of triangle congruency, including exposure to formal proofs and geometric constructions. Then students extend what they have learned to other essential triangle concepts, including similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and the Laws of Sines and Cosines. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Geometry B
This second semester of a one year Geometry course continues the study of shapes as students justify and derive various formulas for circumference, area, and volume, as well as cross-sections of solids and rotations of two-dimensional objects. Students then make important connections between geometry and algebra, including special triangles, slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, and parabolas in the coordinate plane, before delving into an in-depth investigation of the geometry of circles. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis.


Geometry B-CR
This second semester of a one year Geometry course for credit recovery continues the study of shapes as students justify and derive various formulas for circumference, area, and volume, as well as cross-sections of solids and rotations of two-dimensional objects. Students then make important connections between geometry and algebra, including special triangles, slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, and parabolas in the coordinate plane, before delving into an in-depth investigation of the geometry of circles. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


German 1 A
In this first semester of a one year course, middle school students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.


German 1 B
In this second semester of a one year course, middle school students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.


German 2 A
In this first semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to middle school German with this second-year course by covering fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major German- speaking areas in Europe.


German 2 B
In this second semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to middle school German with this second-year course by covering fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major German- speaking areas in Europe.


German I A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.


German I B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe.


German II A
In this first semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to German in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe, and assessments.


German II B
In this second semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to German in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe, and assessments.


Gothic Literature: Monster Stories
From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.


Government (Career Focus Credit Only)
This is a semseter course that provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course builds on the first semester’s foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.


Government (Career Focus Credit Only) – CR
This is a semester course that provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course builds on the first semester’s foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Health and Wellness
Available as either a semester or year-long course, this high-school health offering examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws. This course takes covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and other sensitive topics. For a more conservative approach to health education, the Healthy Living course is also available in the Health and Physical Education Bundle


Health and Wellness – CR
Available as either a semester or year-long course, this high-school health offering examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws. This course takes covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and other sensitive topics. For a more conservative approach to health education, the Healthy Living course is also available in the Health and Physical Education Bundle This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Civics for One Semester
This is a semester course that provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its Amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.


Civics for One Semester – CR
This is a semseter course for credit recovery that provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its Amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Science 6 A
This is the first semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Science 6 A – CR
This is the first semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Science 6 B
This is the second semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Science 6 B – CR
This is the second semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Science 7 A
This is the first semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically


Science 7 A – CR
This is the first semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically


Science 7 B
This is the second semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically


Science 7 B – CR
This is the second semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically


Science 8 A
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the first semester of Grade 8 Science, which is an initial credit two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Science 8 A – CR
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the first semester of Grade 8 Science, which is an initial credit two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Science 8 B
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the second semester of Grade 8 Science, which is an initial credit two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Science 8 B – CR
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the second semester of Grade 8 Science, which is an initial credit two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Grade 6 Physical Science A
This is the first semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 6 Physical Science B
This is the second semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 6 Physical Science A-CR
This is the first semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course for credit recovery that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 6 Physical Science B-CR
This is the second semester of a yearlong sixth-grade course for credit recovery that focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 7 Physical Science A
This is the first semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 7 Physical Science B
This is the second semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 7 Life Science A-CR
This is the first semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course for credit recovery that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 7 Life Science B-CR
This is the second semester of a yearlong seventh-grade course for credit recovery that focuses on introducing students to the diversity of life found on our planet. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of cells and heredity, the five kingdoms, human body systems, and ecology. As students refine and expand their understanding of life science, they will apply their knowledge in investigations that require them to ask questions and explore the world around them. Throughout the course, students will also solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically.


Grade 8 Earth Systems Science A
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the first semester of Grade 8 Earth Systems Science, which is an initial credit two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Grade 8 Earth Systems Science B
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the second semester of Grade 8 Earth Systems Science, which is an initial credit two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Grade 8 Earth Systems Science A-CR
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the first semester of the credit recovery version of Grade 8 Earth Systems Science, which is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Grade 8 Earth Systems Science B-CR
Students enrolled in this dynamic eighth-grade course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. This is the second semester of the credit recovery version of Grade 8 Earth Systems Science, which is a two-semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.


Great Minds in Science: Ideas for a New Generation
Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on 10 of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow d-flex’s world.

Health Science Concepts A
This is the first semester of a yearlong course that introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology?including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.


Health Science Concepts B
This is the first semester of a yearlong course that introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology?including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.


Healthy Living
Healthy Living is a semester-long high school course which focuses exclusively on personal health but in a more conservative and traditional treatment than Contemporary Health. Encouraging students to make responsible, respectful, informed, and capable decisions about topics that affect the well-being of themselves and others, this course provides students with comprehensive information they can use to develop healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Designed for high school students, this informative and engaging course encourages students to recognize that they have the power to choose healthy behaviors to reduce risks.


History of the Holocaust
Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multidisciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students will gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and they will get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.


Hospitality & Tourism: Traveling the Globe
With greater disposable income and more opportunities for business travel, people are traversing the globe in growing numbers. As a result, hospitality and tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. This course will introduce students to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.


Human Biology
Students participating in this course will analyze fundamental biological principles related to the human body. Course topics include the molecular and cellular basis of life, genetics, organ systems, and the impact of nutrition and exercise on human health. Upon course completion, students will be able to describe basic human biology concepts, including skeletal and muscular systems as well as urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. They will be able analyze nervous and sensory systems as related to human health and analyze respiratory, circulatory, immune, and digestive systems. Students will also be able to describe genetics and biotechnology and their application.


Human Geography A
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this is the first semester of a high school course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems?from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution?this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.


Human Geography B
Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this is the second semester of a high school course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems?from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution?this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.


IDEA Writing
Motivating students in grades nine through twelve to become more articulate and effective writers, this one-semester course offers hands-on experience writing personal reflections, definition essays, research essays, persuasive essays, informative essays, and literary analysis essays. Offering targeted lessons on reputable research, effective communication, solid grammar, and compelling style, this one-semester course utilizes the Six Traits of Effective Writing as an overarching framework. Students enrolled in this course develop the skills necessary to evaluate their own writing and articulate and apply writing and researching strategies. In addition, students get further practice applying the grammatical rules of Standard American English in formal writing.


Introduction to Coding
This one semester course focuses students to the essential skills required for Python. Through hands-on projects and written assignments, students gain an understanding of the operation of coding. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the field of IT.


U.S. History I A / Integrated U.S. History A
U.S. History I A is the first semester of a yearlong course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of Jacksonian Democracy. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. “


U.S. History I B / Integrated U.S. History B
U.S. History I B is is the second semester of a yearlong course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from Manifest Destiny through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of the defining moments that shaped the nation of today. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the Civil War and Reconstruction.


U.S. History I A-CR / Integrated U.S. History A-CR
U.S. History I A is the first semester of a yearlong course for credit recovery that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of Jacksonian Democracy. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


U.S. History I B-CR / Integrated U.S. History B-CR
U.S. History I B is is the second semester of a yearlong course for credit recovery that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from Manifest Destiny through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of the defining moments that shaped the nation of today. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the Civil War and Reconstruction. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


International Business: Global Commerce in the 21st Century
From geography to culture Global Business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course is designed to help students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace. It takes a global view on business, investigating why and how companies go international and are more interconnected.

The course further provides students a conceptual tool by which to understand how economic, social, cultural, political and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations will all be explored in this course. Students will cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in both business activities and the 21st century.


Intro to Art
Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, this course encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, this one-semester course provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.


Intro to Entrepreneurship
This one-semester course teaches the key skills and concepts students need to know to plan and launch a business. Students learn about real-life teen entrepreneurs; characteristics of successful entrepreneurs; how to attract investors and manage expenses; sales stages, planning, and budgeting; how to generate business ideas and create a business plan; and how to promote and market a company. Topics include exploring factors of business success and failure, economic systems, competition, production, costs and pricing, accounting, bookkeeping, and financial reporting, working with others, and successfully managing employees.


Introduction to Art History
In this course, students will master the basic art history elements of the Western world, from prehistoric to modern times. Students will explore art exhibits, analyze buildings and architecture, and examine art in everyday life. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to describe art history, examine art from 22,000 BC through 400 AD, distinguish art from 401 AD through 1450 AD, and analyze art from 1451 AD through 1800 AD. They will also be able to categorize art from 1801 AD through 1900 AD and interpret art from 1901 AD through the present.


Introduction to Business A
This is the first semester of a two?semester introductory course in which students learn the principles of business using real?world examples?learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today?s fast?paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.


Introduction to Business B
This is the second semester of a two?semester introductory course in which students learn the principles of business using real?world examples?learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today?s fast?paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economics, costs and profit, and different business types. Students are introduced to techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society both locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity.


Introduction to Communications and Speech
Beginning with an introduction that builds student understanding of the elements, principles, and characteristics of human communication, this course offers fascinating insight into verbal and nonverbal messages and cultural and gender differences in the areas of listening and responding. High school students enrolled in this one-semester course will be guided through engaging lectures and interactive activities, exploring themes of self-awareness and perception in communication. The course concludes with units on informative and persuasive speeches, and students are given the opportunity to critique and analyze speeches.


Introduction to Culinary Arts
Food is all around us—we are dependent on it and we enjoy it. This course will give you the basic fundamentals to start working in the kitchen and gaining experience as you explore and establish your talents for cooking and preparing food in a creative and safe way. You will learn safety measures as well as enhance your knowledge of various types of foods and spices. If you enjoy hands-on learning and want to deepen your knowledge about culinary arts, this is a great course to start.


Introduction to Health Sciences A
This is the first semester of a one year high school course that introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers, as they develop the basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. In addition to learning the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system, students learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the health care field.


Introduction to Health Sciences B
This is the second semester of a one year high school course that introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers, as they develop the basic skills required in all health and medical sciences. In addition to learning the key elements of the U.S. healthcare system, students learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the health care field.


Introduction to Information Technology A
This is the first semester of a one year high school course that introduces students to the essential technical and professional skills required in the field of Information Technology (IT). Through hands-on projects and written assignments, students gain an understanding of the operation of computers, computer networks, Internet fundamentals, programming, and computer support. Students also learn about the social impact of technological change and the ethical issues related to technology. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the field of IT.


Introduction to Information Technology B
This is the second semester of a one year high school course that introduces students to the essential technical and professional skills required in the field of Information Technology (IT). Through hands-on projects and written assignments, students gain an understanding of the operation of computers, computer networks, Internet fundamentals, programming, and computer support. Students also learn about the social impact of technological change and the ethical issues related to technology. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the field of IT.


Introduction to Manufacturing: Product Design & Innovation
Think about the last time you visited your favorite store. Have you ever wondered how the products you buy make it to the store shelves? Whether it’s video games, clothing, or sports equipment, the goods we purchase must go through a manufacturing process before they can be marketed and sold. In this course, you’ll learn about the types of manufacturing systems and processes used to create the products we buy every day. You’ll also be introduced to the various career opportunities in the manufacturing industry including those for engineers, technicians, and supervisors. As a culminating project, you’ll plan your own manufacturing process for a new product or invention! If you thought manufacturing was little more than mundane assembly lines, this course will show you just how exciting and fruitful the industry can be.


Introduction to Military Careers
You’ve probably seen an old movie about a hotshot naval aviator, or perhaps a more recent film about the daring actions of Special Forces operatives. But do you really know what careers the military can offer you? Introduction to Military Careers will provide the answers. The military is far more diverse and offers many more career opportunities and tracks than most people imagine. In Introduction to Military Careers, you’ll learn not only about the four branches of the military (and the Coast Guard) but also about the types of jobs you might pursue in each branch. From aviation to medicine, law enforcement to dentistry, the military can be an outstanding place to pursue your dreams.


Introduction to Philosophy: The Big Picture
This course will take you on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history! Along the way, you’ll run into some very strange characters. For example, you’ll read about a man who hung out on street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he met with questions. You’ll learn about another eccentric who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed. Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As you learn about these great thinkers, you’ll come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western Civilization originated. You’ll also get a chance to ask yourself some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered. By the time you’ve “closed the book” on this course, you will better understand yourself and the world around you…from atoms to outer space…and everything in between.


Introduction to Psychology
In this course, students will become familiar with the basic principles of psychology and the scientific method. Students will study a variety of topics, including the brain, learning and memory, personality, social influence, child and lifespan development, and psychopathology. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify foundational philosophies, therapies, and specializations in the field of psychology; analyze developmental psychology across lifespans; and identify theories of personality and personality assessment. They will also be able to articulate scientific research methodology, analytical approaches in the field of psychology, and how the brain and psychological factors impact mental health and behavior, as well as classify psychological disorders and their impact on well-being.


Introduction to Social Media: Our Connected World
Have a Facebook account? What about Twitter? Whether you’ve already dipped your toes in the waters of social media or are still standing on the shore wondering what to make of it all, learning how to interact on various social media platforms is crucial in order to survive and thrive in this age of digital communication. In this course, you’ll learn the ins and outs of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and more. You’ll also discover other types of social media you may not have been aware of and how to use them for your benefit—personally, academically, and eventually professionally as well. If you thought social media platforms were just a place to keep track of friends and share personal photos, this course will show you how to use these resources in much more powerful ways.


Introduction to Sociology
This course will encompass the basic principles of sociology. Students will learn a variety of topics including sociological theory and basic research methods, as well as specific theories of culture, deviance, social interaction, diversity, stratification, education, technology, and health in modern society. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify foundational philosophies, theories, and methods in the field of sociology and apply principles of culture and deviance to real-life scenarios. They will be able to analyze social interaction and collective behavior in a real-world context; identify and apply elements of diversity, stratification, and inequality in real life; and analyze sociological perspectives on elements of modern society.


Introduction to Statistics
Students in this course will master the basic principles of statistics. The course covers topics that include statistical principles, research methodologies, data analysis, and hypothesis testing. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to grasp and identify key principles of statistical reasoning and methods; apply concepts of data and data representation in a real-world context; calculate variation and central tendency and recognize patterns in distributions; and apply concepts of probability and risk in real-life scenarios. Additionally, students will be able to determine correlation and causation and distinguish between them in context. They will be able to apply concepts of hypothesis testing and utilize t-tests, z-tests, and ANOVA in real-world situations.


Introduction to Women’s Studies: A Personal Journey through Film>
This course, although looking specifically at the experiences of women, is not for girls only. If you are student interested in exploring the world through film and open minded enough to sbe interested in social change, this course is for you.


Oral Communication
Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy & Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Presented as two, one-semester, reading-intervention courses, each offers an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.


Oral Communication – CR
Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy & Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Presented as two, one-semester, reading-intervention courses, each offers an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.


Journalism: Investigating the Truth
If you’re the first to know what’s going on in your school or town, or the first to post on Facebook or Instagram about your favorite TV shows or favorite celebrities, then you’re just the person that every online, in-print, and broadcast news outlet is looking for. And Journalism: Investigating the Truth is the perfect course for you! In this course, you’ll learn how to write a lead that grabs your readers, how to write engaging news stories and features, and how to interview sources. You’ll also learn about the history of journalism, how to succeed in the world of social media news, and how to turn your writing, photography, and people skills into an exciting and rewarding career.


Latin 1 A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in middle school begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin 1 B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in middle school begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin 2 A
In this first semester of a one year course, middle school students continue their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin 2 B
In this second semester of a one year course, middle school students continue their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin I A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin I B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in high school begin their introduction to Latin with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin II A
In this first semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Latin II B
In this second semester of a one year course, students continue their introduction to in this second-year high school language course with review of fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture or their modern-day manifestations, and assessments.


Law & Order: Introduction to Legal Studies
Every society has laws that its citizens must follow. From traffic laws to regulations on how the government operates, laws help provide society with order and structure. Our lives are guided and regulated by our society’s legal expectations. Consumer laws help protect us from faulty goods; criminal laws help to protect society from individuals who harm others; and family law handles the arrangements and issues that arise in areas like divorce and child custody. This course focuses on the creation and application of laws in various areas of society. By understanding the workings of our court system, as well as how laws are actually carried out, we become more informed and responsible citizens in our communities and of our nation.


Lifetime Fitness
Exploring fitness topics such as safe exercise and injury prevention, nutrition and weight management, consumer product evaluation, and stress management, this course equips high school students with the skills they need to achieve lifetime fitness. Throughout this one-semester course, students assess individual fitness levels according to the five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Personal fitness assessments encourage students to design a fitness program to meet their individual fitness goals.


Literacy & Comprehension I
This course is one of two, semester-long intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.


Literacy & Comprehension II
Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade, this course works in conjunction with Literacy & Comprehension I to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Presented as two, one-semester, reading-intervention courses, each offers an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning.


Lord of the Rings: An Exploration of the Films and Their Literary Influence
The Lord of the Rings is one of the most popular stories in the modern world. In this course, you will study the movie versions of J.R.R. Tolkein’s novel and learn about the process of converting literature to film. You will explore fantasy literature as a genre and critique the three Lord of the Rings films.


Macroeconomics
Students in this course will explore and interpret the behavior of economies and countries at both national and international levels. Through this exploration, students will learn how to evaluate decisions on monetary and fiscal policy. Students will also learn how to apply conceptual principles of macroeconomics in practical ways to everyday life.


Marine Science: Secrets of the Blue
Have you wondered about the secrets of the deep and how the creatures below the ocean’s surface live and thrive? Understand more about the aquatic cycles, structures, and processes that generate and sustain life in the sea.


Mathematical Models with Applications A
This is the first semester of a full year course. Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.


Mathematical Models with Applications B
This is the second semester of a full year course. Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.


Mathematics 6 A
This first semester of a one year course begins by connecting ratio and rate to multiplication and division, allowing students to use ratio reasoning to solve a wide variety of problems. Students further apply their understanding of multiplication and division to explain the standard procedure for dividing fractions. Finally, this course builds upon previous notions of the number system to now include the entire set of rational numbers.


Mathematics 6 B
In this second semester of a one year course, students begin to understand the use of variables as they write, evaluate, and simplify expressions. They use the idea of equality and properties of operations to solve one-step equations and inequalities. In statistics, students explore different graphical ways to display data. They use data displays, measures of center, and measures of variability to summarize data sets. The course concludes with students reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.


Mathematics 6 A-CR
This first semester of a one year course for credit recovery begins by connecting ratio and rate to multiplication and division, allowing students to use ratio reasoning to solve a wide variety of problems. Students further apply their understanding of multiplication and division to explain the standard procedure for dividing fractions. Finally, this course builds upon previous notions of the number system to now include the entire set of rational numbers. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathematics 6 B-CR
In this second semester of a one year course for credit recovery, students begin to understand the use of variables as they write, evaluate, and simplify expressions. They use the idea of equality and properties of operations to solve one-step equations and inequalities. In statistics, students explore different graphical ways to display data. They use data displays, measures of center, and measures of variability to summarize data sets. The course concludes with students reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathematics 7 A
This course begins with an in-depth study of proportional reasoning during which students utilize concrete models such as bar diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students? number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational numbers embedded in real-world contexts.Finally, students develop an understanding of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.


Mathematics 7 B
This course begins with an in-depth study of sampling and populations. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.


Mathematics 7 A-CR
This credit recovery course begins with an in-depth study of proportional reasoning during which students utilize concrete models such as bar diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students? number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational numbers embedded in real-world contexts.Finally, students develop an understanding of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathematics 7 B-CR
This credit recovery course begins with an in-depth study of sampling and populations. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathematics 8 A
This first semester of Mathematics 8 begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations.


Mathematics 8 B
This second semester of Mathematics 8 begins with a unit on transformations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean Theorem, distance, and volume.


Mathematics 8 A-CR
This first semester of Mathematics 8 for credit recovery begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathematics 8 B-CR
This second semester of Mathematics 8 for credit recovery begins with a unit on transformations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean Theorem, distance, and volume. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathmatics I A
The first in an integrated math series for high school, this is the first semester of a full year course that formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students? understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.


Mathmatics I A-CR
The first in an integrated math series for high school, this is the first semester of a full year course for credit recovery that formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students? understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathmatics I B
The first in an integrated math series for high school, this is the second semester of a full year course that formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students? understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.


Mathmatics I B-CR
The first in an integrated math series for high school, this is the second semester of a full year course for credit recovery that formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students? understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathmatics II A
This first semester of a full year course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. “


Mathmatics II A-CR
This first semester of a full year course for credit recovery begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathmatics II B
In this second semester of a full year course, students explore right triangles with an introduction to right-triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.


Mathmatics II B-CR
In this second semester of a full year course for credit recovery, students explore right triangles with an introduction to right-triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Mathmatics III A
This course is the first semester of a two semester course that synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Finally, students expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. “


Mathmatics III A-CR
This credit recovery course is the first semester of a two semester course that synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Finallt, students expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.

Mathmatics III B
This course is the second semester of a two semester course that synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. Students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.


Mathmatics III B-CR
This credit recovery course is the second semester of a two semester course that synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. Students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Medical Terminology
This semester-long course introduces students to the structure of medical terms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to health care settings, medical procedures, pharmacology, human anatomy and physiology, and pathology. The knowledge and skills gained in this course provide students entering the health care field with a deeper understanding of the application of the language of health and medicine. Students are introduced to these skills through direct instruction, interactive tasks, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments.


Microeconomics
This course will focus on the behavior of individual consumers and firms in the marketplace and will help students learn how to evaluate decisions, both public and private, with an eye towards production, consumption, and transfer of wealth. Students will also learn how to apply conceptual principles of microeconomics in practical ways to everyday life. Upon course completion, students will be able to describe economics, examine the consumer, analyze businesses, and interpret market interactions as they relate to consumers and businesses.


Microsoft Office® Specialist A
This is the first semester of a two-semester course that introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft? Office? 2010 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft User Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word?, Excel?, PowerPoint?, Outlook?, and Access?. By the end of the course, students are prepared to demonstrate their skills by obtaining one or more MOS certifications.


Microsoft Office® Specialist B
This is the second semester of a two-semester course that introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft? Office? 2010 while preparing them for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of the Microsoft User Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word?, Excel?, PowerPoint?, Outlook?, and Access?. By the end of the course, students are prepared to demonstrate their skills by obtaining one or more MOS certifications.


Middle School 2D Studio Art
Journey inside the art studio and learn to bring your 2D art visions to life. Whatever medium you prefer, painting or drawing, this course will help you hone your 2D art skills. Learn the elements and principles needed to logistically create art; explore your artistic inspirations; view art from different ages and cultures; gain insight about the art of critiquing.


Middle School Digital Art and Design
Digital art and design involves everything from advertising to animation to photography and more. In this course, you’ll learn about the evolution of art; the basic principles of art and design; the role of art in politics and society; and how to create digital art and make it come alive.


Middle School Exploring Music
Learn about how we hear music, its history and culture, and how it affects our lives. Explore the elements of music, such as rhythm, pitch, and harmony, while discovering more about musical genres, singing and your voice, instruments, and musical composition. Tune up your understanding and appreciation for all things musical.


Middle School Journalism: Tell Your Story
Who? What? When? Where? Journalism provides us with the answers to these questions for the events that affect our lives. In this course, students will learn how to gather information, organize ideas, format stories for different forms of news media, and edit their stories for publication. The course will also examine the historical development of journalism and the role of journalism in society.


Middle School Photography: Drawing with Light
Students see photographs every day on television, on the Internet, and in magazines and newspapers. What makes a great photograph? How did the artist capture a story? What makes a great picture? What are careers in photography? In this course, students learn and apply fundamental skills to use a camera and take photographs of animals, people, and landscapes. Students gain an understanding of how photography can be a means of documentation or high art. Students examine photographic careers and explore self-reflection to progress their creative growth as they develop a photographic portfolio. This course helps students select subjects, take a photograph, and print and display memories!


Modern World History A
This is the first semester of a two semester course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.


Modern World History A-CR
This first semester of a two semester credit recovery course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.


Modern World History B
This is the second semester of a two semester course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.


Modern World History B-CR
This second semester of a two semester credit recovery course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives.



Music Appreciation: The Enjoyment of Listening
Music is part of everyday lives and reflects the spirit of our human condition. To know and understand music, we distinguish and identify cultures on local and global levels. This course will provide students with an aesthetic and historical perspective of music, covering a variety of styles and developments from the Middle Ages through the Twentieth First Century. Students will acquire basic knowledge and listening skills, making future music experiences more informed and satisfying.


Mythology & Folklore: Legendary Tales
Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Since the first people gathered around fires, mythology and folklore has been used as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. Beginning with an overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore, students will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters outwit those stronger than themselves. They will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how these are still used to shape society today.


National Security
In this course, you will learn the critical elements of this very important career, such as evaluating satellite information, analyzing training procedures, assessing military engagement, and preparing intelligence reports. In addition, you will gain a better understanding of appropriate responses to security threats and how best to coordinate information with other agencies. Nutrition This course takes students through a comprehensive study of nutritional principles and guidelines. Students learn about worldwide views of nutrition, essential nutrient requirements, physiological processes, food labeling, weight management, healthy food choices, fitness, diet-related diseases and disorders, food handling, healthy cooking, nutrition for different populations, and more. Students gain important knowledge and skills to aid them in attaining and maintaining a healthy and nutritious lifestyle.


Nutrition and Wellness
of nutritional principles and guidelines. Students learn about worldwide views of nutrition, essential nutrient requirements, physiological processes, food labeling, weight management, healthy food choices, fitness, diet-related diseases and disorders, food handling, healthy cooking, nutrition for different populations, and more. Students gain important knowledge and skills to aid them in attaining and maintaining a healthy and nutritious lifestyle.


Online Learning & Digital Citizenship
In this one-semester course, students develop essential study skills for academic success, such as staying organized, managing time, taking notes, applying reading strategies, writing strong papers, and researching and properly citing information. Explicit modeling and ample practice are provided for each study skill to support student mastery. Instruction on how to be a responsible online learner is threaded throughout the course, and these skills are directly addressed in lessons on cyberbullying, staying safe online, and learning how to be a digital leader. A basic understanding of software and hardware and how to troubleshoot common technology issues are also taught. By the end of the course, students will have the tools they need to be academically successful in both traditional and digital learning environments.


Peer Counseling
Helping people achieve their goals is one of the most rewarding of human experiences. Peer counselors help individuals reach their goals by offering them support, encouragement, and resource information. This course explains the role of a peer counselor, teaches the observation, listening, and emphatic communication skills that counselors need, and provides basic training in conflict resolution, and group leadership. Not only will this course prepare you for working as a peer counselor, but the skills taught will enhance your ability to communicate effectively in your personal and work relationships.


Personal Finance
This introductory finance course teaches what it takes to understand the world of finance and make informed decisions about managing finances. Students learn more about economics and become more confident in setting and researching financial goals as they develop the core skills needed to be successful. In this one-semester course, students learn how to open bank accounts, invest money, apply for loans, apply for insurance, explore careers, manage business finances, make decisions about major purchases, and more. Students will be inspired by stories from finance professionals and individuals who have reached their financial goals.


Physical Science-Integrated A
This is the first semester of a full-year course that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available.


Physical Science-Integrated A – CR
This is the first semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physical Science-Integrated B
This is the second semester of a full-year course that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available.


Physical Science-Integrated B – CR
This is the second semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physical Science A
This is the first semester of a full-year course that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available.


Physical Science A-CR
This is the first semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physical Science B
This is the second semester of a full-year course that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available.


Physical Science B CR
This is the second semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physics 422010 A
This first semester of a full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course offers and introduction to physics and discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravity, work and energy, oscillatory motion, waves, and electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options.


Physics 422010 A – CR
This first semester of a full-year credit recovery course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course offers and introduction to physics and discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravity, work and energy, oscillatory motion, waves, and electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physics 422010 B
This second semester of a full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course offers and introduction to physics and discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravity, work and energy, oscillatory motion, waves, and electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options.


Physics 422010 B – CR
This second semester of a full-year credit recovery course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course offers and introduction to physics and discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravity, work and energy, oscillatory motion, waves, and electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physics A
This first semester of a full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course offers and introduction to physics and discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravity, work and energy, oscillatory motion, waves, and electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options.


Physics A-CR
This first semester of a full-year credit recovery course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course offers and introduction to physics and discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravity, work and energy, oscillatory motion, waves, and electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Physics B
This second semester of a full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course discusses the topics of electric circuits, light, fluids, sound, heat, nuclear physics and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options.


Physics B-CR
This second semester of a full-year credit recovery course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course discusses the topics of electric circuits, light, fluids, sound, heat, nuclear physics and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, with some problem solving. There are interactive conceptual and problem-solving examples throughout the lessons, as well as interactive lab simulations and in-school, hands-on lab options. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Pre-Algebra A
This is the first semester of a full-year course that is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebraready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.


Pre-Algebra A-CR
This is the first semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebraready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study. This credit recovery course version pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Pre-Algebra B
This is the second semester of a full-year course that is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebraready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.


Pre-Algebra B-CR
This is the second semester of a full-year course for credit recovery that is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebraready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study. This credit recovery course version pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Precalculus A
This is the first semester of a one year course. With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. “


Precalculus A-Honors
This is the first semester of the full-year advanced math course that starts with a unit on the nature of functions and complex numbers before moving into matrices, systems, and linear programming. Students then return to functions with a focus on graphing a variety of function types; this unit includes a performance task on production schemes. Students explore rational functions in depth and then conclude the first semester with right triangle and circular trigonometry. In the second half of the course, students will synthesize what they have learned to graph and solve trigonometric functions. They also study vectors, conics and analytic geometry, statistics and probability, mathematical modeling, and sequences and series.


Precalculus A-CR
This is the first semester of a one year course for credit recovery. With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Precalculus B
This is the second semester of a one year course. With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.


Precalculus B-Honors
This is the second semester of the full-year advanced math course that starts with a unit on the nature of functions and complex numbers before moving into matrices, systems, and linear programming. Students then return to functions with a focus on graphing a variety of function types; this unit includes a performance task on production schemes. Students explore rational functions in depth and then conclude the first semester with right triangle and circular trigonometry. In this second half of the course, students synthesize what they have learned to graph and solve trigonometric functions. They also study vectors, conics and analytic geometry, statistics and probability, mathematical modeling, and sequences and series.


Precalculus B-CR
This is the second semester of a one year course for credit recovery. With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Principles of Public Service
Have you ever wondered who decides where to put roads? Or makes sure that someone answers the phone when you call 911? Or determines that a new drug is safe for the public? These tasks and many more are part of public service, a field that focuses on building healthy societies. Public service includes many different types of careers, but they all have in common the goal of working for others. This course will explore some of the most common career paths in public service. Working for the public also comes with a very specific set of expectations since protecting society is such an important mission. So if you want to work for the greater good, there is probably a public service career for you!

Psychology A
This is the first semester of a two-semester course that introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.


Psychology B
This is the first semester of a two-semester course that introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.


Public Speaking
The art of public speaking is one which underpins the very foundations of Western society. This course examines those foundations in both Aristotle and Cicero’s views of rhetoric, and then traces those foundations into the modern world. Students will learn not just the theory, but also the practice of effective public speaking, including how to analyze the speeches of others, build a strong argument, and speak with confidence and flair. By the end of this course, students will know exactly what makes a truly successful speech and will be able to put that knowledge to practical use.


Project Management
Students in this course will go through the life cycle of managing a project, from designing the scope to completing the project and celebrating success. Along the way, students will gain applied experience with project planning as well as managing project resources and risks.


Social Problems I: A World in Crisis
Students will become aware of the challenges faced by social groups, as well as learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments and the individual. Each unit is focused on a particular area of concern, often within a global context. Possible solutions at both the structural level as well as that of the individual will be examined. Students will not only learn more about how social problems affect them personally, but begin to develop the skills necessary to help make a difference in their own lives and communities, not to mention globally.


Social Problems II: Crisis, Conflicts & Challenges
The Social Problems II course continues to examine timely social issues affecting individuals and societies around the globe. Students learn about the overall structure of the social problem as well as how it impacts their lives. Each unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both individual and structural levels. For each issue, students examine the connections in the global arena involving societies, governments and the individual.


Sociology
Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.


Spanish 1 A
In this first semester of a one year course, middle school students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish 1 B
In this second semester of a one year course, middle school students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish 2 A
In this first semester of a one year course, students in middle school continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish 2 B
In this second semester of a one year course, students in middle school continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish I A
In this first semester of a one year course, students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish I B
In this second semester of a one year course, students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish II A
In this first semester of a one year course, high school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.


Spanish II B
In this second semester of a one year course, high school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.


Spanish III A
In this first semester of a one year expanding engagement with Spanish, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Spanish III B
In this second semester of a one year expanding engagement with Spanish, high school students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish, and respond orally or in writing to these works. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.


Sports & Entertainment Marketing
Have you ever wished to play sports professionally? Have you dreamed of one day becoming an agent for a celebrity entertainer? If you answered yes to either question, then believe it or not, you’ve been fantasizing about entering the exciting world of sports and entertainment marketing. Although this particular form of marketing bears some resemblance to traditional marketing, there are many differences as well—including a lot more glitz and glamour! In this course, you’ll have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. You’ll learn about how professional athletes, sports teams, and well known entertainers are marketed as commodities and how some of them become billionaires as a result. If you’ve ever wondered about how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event such as the Super Bowl or even entertained the idea of playing a role in such an event, then this course will introduce you to the fundamentals of such a career.


Statistics A
This first semester of a year-long course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. The course begins with an introduction to data collection, with a focus on sampling methods and study design. Students explore a variety of ways to analyze and understand collected data. Then students apply what they have learned to an in-depth study of data representation.


Statistics A – CR
This first semester of a year-long credit recovery course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. The course begins with an introduction to data collection, with a focus on sampling methods and study design. Students explore a variety of ways to analyze and understand collected data. Then students apply what they have learned to an in-depth study of data representation. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Statistics B
This second semester of a year-long course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. The course begins with an introduction to data collection, with a focus on sampling methods and study design. Students explore a variety of ways to analyze and understand collected data. Then students apply what they have learned to an in-depth study of data representation.


Statistics B – CR
This second semester of a year-long credit recovery course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. The course begins with an introduction to data collection, with a focus on sampling methods and study design. Students explore a variety of ways to analyze and understand collected data. Then students apply what they have learned to an in-depth study of data representation. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Statistics and Probability A
This first semester of a year-long course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. The course begins with an introduction to data collection, with a focus on sampling methods and study design. Students explore a variety of ways to analyze and understand collected data. Then students apply what they have learned to an in-depth study of data representation.


Statistics and Probability B
This second semester of a year-long course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. Students investigate probability, including experimental and theoretical probability and probability with permutations and combinations. The course closes with an introduction to standard deviation and distributions.


Statistics and Probability A-CR
This first semester of a year-long credit recovery course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. The course begins with an introduction to data collection, with a focus on sampling methods and study design. Students explore a variety of ways to analyze and understand collected data. Then students apply what they have learned to an in-depth study of data representation. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Statistics and Probability B-CR
This second semester of a year-long credit recovery course is designed to provide students with a real-world understanding of the basic applications of probability and statistics. The course gives students methods for summarizing data, introduces students to mathematical models for random phenomena, and provides the tools for decision making under uncertainty. Students investigate probability, including experimental and theoretical probability and probability with permutations and combinations. The course closes with an introduction to standard deviation and distributions. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Strategies for Academic Success*
Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this one-semester course encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.


Theater, Cinema & Film Production
Lights! Camera! Action! This course will introduce students to the basics of film and theater productions. Students will learn about the basics of lighting, sound, wardrobe, and camerawork for both film and theater settings. The course also explores the history of film and theater and the influence that they have had on society. Students will analyze and critique three influential American films, Casablanca, Singin’ in the Rain, and The Wizard of Oz.


Trigonometry
In this one-semester course, students use their geometry and algebra skills to begin their study of trigonometry. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. This course begins with a quick overview of right-triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry, and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the Laws of Sines and Cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. This course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre?s Theorem.


Trigonometry CR
In this one-semester course, students use their geometry and algebra skills to begin their study of trigonometry. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. This course begins with a quick overview of right-triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry, and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the Laws of Sines and Cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. This course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre?s Theorem. This credit recovery course version pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


U.S. History A
U.S. History A is the first semester of a year-long course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives.


U.S. History A-CR
U.S. History A is the first semester of a year-long credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


U.S. History B
U.S. History B is the second semester of a year-long course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives.


U.S. History B-CR
U.S. History B is the second semester of a year-long credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


U.S. History Grade 8 A
U.S. History A is the first semester of a year-long course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives.


U.S. History Grade 8 A – CR
U.S. History A is the first semester of a year-long credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


U.S. History Grade 8 B
U.S. History B is the second semester of a year-long course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives.


U.S. History Grade 8 B – CR
U.S. History B is the second semester of a year-long credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


US History Since 1890 A
U.S. History I A is the first semester of a yearlong course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of Jacksonian Democracy. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government.


US History Since 1890 A – CR
U.S. History I A is the first semester of a yearlong course for credit recovery that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of Jacksonian Democracy. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


US History Since 1890 B
U.S. History I B is the second semester of a yearlong course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of Jacksonian Democracy. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government.


US History Since 1890 B – CR
U.S. History I B is the second semester of a yearlong course for credit recovery that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of Jacksonian Democracy. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Visual Communications
This course will cover basic concepts of visual design and how to apply these concepts in context. Students will explore visual theories and key elements and principles of design, with an emphasis on color, typography, and layout. They will also learn how to analyze a visual design and understand visual design’s role in today’s society. Upon course completion, students will be able to examine basic visual design concepts, distinguish the principles and elements of design, analyze the role of visual design in communication, and communicate effectively through visual design.


Western Hemisphere Studies A
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the first semester of a two-semester middle school course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the western hemisphere. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns.


Western Hemisphere Studies B
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the western hemisphere. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns.


Western Hemisphere Studies A-CR
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the first semester of a two-semester middle school course for credit recovery that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the western hemisphere. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


Western Hemisphere Studies B-CR
Comprehensive and organized by region, this is the second semester of a two-semester middle school course for credit recovery that helps students understand the physical and human diversity of the western hemisphere. The course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. It continues with an in-depth focus on human beginnings, migration, and conquest. Once students have examined physical and human geography, the concepts of both are applied to the various regions of the western hemisphere as students study the Americas. Offering interactive content that will grow students? understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems, this course encourages students to analyze economic trends and global markets and concerns. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World History A
This is the first semester of a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations up to the Age of Revolution. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.


World History A-CR
This is the first semester of a yearlong credit recovery course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations up to the Age of Revolution. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World History B
This is the second semester of a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students begin with a study of nationalism and industrialism, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.


World History B-CR
This is the second semester of a yearlong course for credit recovery that examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students begin with a study of nationalism and industrialism, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. This credit recovery course version offers complete coverage of the standards, but pretests students to focus on non-mastered material and contains a variation of lessons and assignments to allow for shorter completion time.


World Religions: Exploring Diversity
Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taosim. Students will trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course will also discuss some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examine the connections and influences they have.


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